Project: Future Fires

Future fire regimes in the Pyrocene

Large and severe wildfires impact people and places globally, and recent examples of extensive wildfires around the world – from Southeastern Australia, Western USA, Greece, Portugal, Canada, and, unexpectedly, in the historically cool climates of Sweden and England – are stark reminders of the enduring challenge they pose to societies and ecosystems. The Future Fire Regime program seeks to consider emerging threats from changing fire regimes on a range of fronts – whether this be predicting likely future fire scenarios, understanding the threat these pose to ecosystem values, to understand how forest and fire management can adapt.

Project timeline: 06/2021 – 06/2024

More Projects

Mulching as a fuel management technique

Fire managers use a range of methods to manage fuels as a means of reducing bushfire risk. Mulching is one such method where the understorey vegetation is shredded, chipped or mulched to reduce the bushfire hazard and make fire suppression more ...

Wet forest ignitability

Wet eucalypt forests (dominated by Mountain Ash or Alpine Ash) are usually too wet to burn but when they dry out enough to become flammable they are one of our most dangerous fuel types. Despite this fire threat, we understand very little about ...

Examining forest flammability pathways as a function of previous fire event severity

This Master of Science (Ecosystem Science) research project will examine the effect of past fire severity on subsequent fuel structure and fire hazard. By combining field work with remote sensing, this project will test approaches to using ...

Calling for PhD Candidates…

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