Project: Ecosystem Interaction | Future Fires

Interactions between fire regimes, climate and other environmental gradients shape plant diversity in heathland communities

Fire is a key driver of plant diversity globally. Heathlands are fire-prone and species-rich. Many species demonstrate fire adaptations such as post-fire resprouting, fire-stimulated germination, and fire-stimulated seed release. However, changes in fire frequency and severity can cause plant population declines. Therefore, this project aims to quantify plant diversity under variations in fire regimes, climate and other environmental contexts. This project combines quantifications of the extant vegetation with soil and canopy seedbank studies, across fire interval, fire severity, and environmental gradients. The knowledge acquired in this work will assist land managers by identifying the range of fire regimes that protect plant diversity in heathlands.

Project timeline: 02/2020 – 12/2023

More Projects

Restoration of eucalypt forest in Wilsons Promontory National Park- Implications for forest values and site and landscape flammability

Wilsons Promontory provides an example of how repeated short interval fires can prevent the regeneration of a Eucalyptus canopy in a range of ecological vegetation classes. The ‘destocking’ of forests can dramatically alter the composition, ...

Barwon South West fuel accumulation for the Woodland Heath fuel type

This research project aims to improve current fuel accumulation curves in the Woodland Heath fuel type. To do this, we have developed a new quantitative field method for assessing fuel hazard based on the modification of the Overall Fuel Hazard ...

Cost effectiveness

Fire managers are increasingly relying on fuel management and suppression efforts to control the impacts of shifting fire regimes. Previous research has demonstrated that when properly applied, these management actions can reduce risks. ...

Calling for PhD Candidates…

X