Project: Ecosystem Interaction

Impact of prescribed burning scenarios on age class diversity

Prescribed burning is a common fire management strategy in Australia that is deployed to minimise wildfire risks through the reduction of fuel in fire-prone areas. The scale of prescribed burning has increased over the years to reduce the increasing wildfire risks due to climate change, and it is important to reduce any adverse effects to biodiversity and other environmental values from this practice. Age classes represent the different age groups of vegetation stands within a type of ecosystem, and the diversity of age classes is important for supporting its biodiversity. This research project aims to evaluate the impacts of different prescribed burning scenarios on the diversity of age classes by analysing outputs from simulation platforms. The analysis of these simulation outputs will be directed to identify the scenarios that result in the most optimal diversity of age classes for biodiversity. The outcomes of this project intend to inform environmental assessment within risk modelling for fire management.

 

Project timeline: 01/2024 – 06/2024

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